Approaches to solve inverse problems for optical sensing around corners

Martin Laurenzis, Jonathan Klein, Emmanuel Bacher, and Stephane Schertzer
In: SPIE Security + Defense: Emerging Imaging and Sensing Technologies (Oct. 2019)
 

Abstract

Optically non-line-of-sight sensing or seeing around the corner is a computational imaging approach describing a classical inverse problem where information about a hidden scene has to be reconstructed from a set of indirect measurements. In the last decade, this field has been intensively studied by different groups, using several sensory and reconstruction approaches. We focus on active sensing with two main concepts: The reconstruction of reflective surfaces by back-projection of time-of-flight data and a six degree-of-freedom tracking of a rigid body from intensity images using an analysis-by-synthesis method. In the first case, the inverse problem can be approximately solved by back-projection of the transient data to obtain a geometrical shape of the hidden scene. Using intensity images, only the diffusely reflected blurred intensity distribution and no time information is recorded. This problem can be solved by an analysis-of-synthesis approach.

Bibtex

@ARTICLE{Laurenzis2019,
    author = {Laurenzis, Martin and Klein, Jonathan and Bacher, Emmanuel and Schertzer, Stephane},
     title = {Approaches to solve inverse problems for optical sensing around corners},
   journal = {SPIE Security + Defense: Emerging Imaging and Sensing Technologies},
      year = {2019},
     month = oct,
  abstract = {Optically non-line-of-sight sensing or seeing around the corner is a computational imaging approach
              describing a classical inverse problem where information about a hidden scene has to be
              reconstructed from a set of indirect measurements. In the last decade, this field has been
              intensively studied by different groups, using several sensory and reconstruction approaches. We
              focus on active sensing with two main concepts: The reconstruction of reflective surfaces by
              back-projection of time-of-flight data and a six degree-of-freedom tracking of a rigid body from
              intensity images using an analysis-by-synthesis method. In the first case, the inverse problem can
              be approximately solved by back-projection of the transient data to obtain a geometrical shape of
              the hidden scene. Using intensity images, only the diffusely reflected blurred intensity
              distribution and no time information is recorded. This problem can be solved by an
              analysis-of-synthesis approach.}
}