Non-Photorealistic Rendering of Complex 3D Models on Mobile Devices

D. Hekmatzada, Jan Meseth, and Reinhard Klein
In proceedings of 8th Annual Conference of the International Association for Mathematical Geology, pages 93-98, Alfred-Wegener-Stiftung, Sept. 2002
 

Abstract

Upon today, mobile geographic information systems (GISs) for handheld devices were limited to display of 2D graphics since interactive visualization of complex, textured 3D meshes appears to be impossible due to lack of specialized hardware and memory constraints.

In this paper, we present an approach to render large, triangular meshes on mobile devices with non-photorealistic rendering techniques, thereby achieving visually appealing results at interactive rates. An important feature of our system is the use of progressive level of detail (LOD) representations for the transmitted models, which enables coarse renderings of the model to be loaded very quickly even at limited bandwidth. For the transmission we designed a special protocol assuming a reliable, wireless or wired communication channel.

We report results on the implementation of several different non-photorealistic rendering techniques like silhouette-drawing and feature-edge drawing, which all produce images containing the most important details of the underlying environments. We show that complex 3D GIS models can be rendered at close to real-time frame rates. Our approach is capable of providing enhanced navigation, perfectly suited for the human since the views shown on the screen of the handheld device match the user's view of the environment. It enables the use of 3D town-models even on present-day, low-cost mobile devices.

Keywords: client-server rendering, mobile GIS, non-photorealistic rendering

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Bibtex

@INPROCEEDINGS{hekmatzada-2002-NPRonPDA,
       author = {Hekmatzada, D. and Meseth, Jan and Klein, Reinhard},
        pages = {93--98},
        title = {Non-Photorealistic Rendering of Complex 3D Models on Mobile Devices},
    booktitle = {8th Annual Conference of the International Association for Mathematical Geology},
       volume = {2},
         year = {2002},
        month = sep,
    publisher = {Alfred-Wegener-Stiftung},
  institution = {Universit{\"a}t Bonn},
     keywords = {client-server rendering, mobile GIS, non-photorealistic rendering},
     abstract = {Upon today, mobile geographic information systems (GISs) for handheld
                 devices were limited to display of 2D graphics since interactive
                 visualization of complex, textured 3D meshes appears to be impossible due to
                 lack of specialized hardware and memory constraints.
                 
                 In this paper, we present an approach to render large, triangular meshes on
                 mobile devices with non-photorealistic rendering techniques, thereby
                 achieving visually appealing results at interactive rates. An important
                 feature of our system is the use of progressive level of detail (LOD)
                 representations for the transmitted models, which enables coarse renderings
                 of the model to be loaded very quickly even at limited bandwidth. For the
                 transmission we designed a special
                 protocol assuming a reliable, wireless or wired communication channel.
                 
                 We report results on the implementation of several different
                 non-photorealistic rendering techniques like silhouette-drawing and
                 feature-edge drawing, which all produce images containing the most important
                 details of the underlying environments. We show that complex 3D GIS models
                 can be rendered at close to real-time frame rates. Our approach is capable
                 of providing enhanced navigation, perfectly suited for the human since the
                 views shown on the screen of the handheld device match the user's view of
                 the environment. It enables the use of 3D town-models even on present-day,
                 low-cost mobile devices.}
}