Progressive Gap Closing for Mesh Repairing

J. Vince and R. Earnshaw (Editors)
In: Advances in Modelling, Animation and Rendering, Computer Graphics Society (CGS), pages 201-213, Springer Verlag, July 2002
Presented at Computer Graphics International (CGI2002)
 

Abstract

Modern 3D acquisition and modeling tools generate high-quality, detailed geometric models. However, in order to cope with the associated complexity, several mesh decimation methods have been developed in the recent years. On the other hand, a common problem of geometric modeling tools is the generation of consistent three-dimensional meshes. Most of these programs output meshes containing degenerate faces, T-vertices, narrow gaps and cracks. Applying well-established decimation methods to such meshes results in severe artifacts due to lack of consistent connectivity information. The industrial relevance of this problem is emphasized by the fact that as an output of most of the commercial CAD/CAM and other modeling tools, the user usually gets consistent meshes only for separate polygonal patches as opposed to the whole mesh.

In this paper we propose a solution, which interprets the above issue as a mesh boundary decimation task. As suggested by Garland and Heckbert and Popovic and Hoppe, adding a vertex pair contraction operation enables to join unconnected regions of the mesh. In addition to this and the usual edge-collapse operation, we introduce a new vertex-edge collapse operation. This provides extra support for closing gaps and stitching together the boundaries of triangle patches lying in near proximity to each other. In our method, the decimation process is error controlled and conducted in a progressive manner in terms of the error. Therefore, the user is enabled to visually inspect and interactively influence the procedure.

Keywords: CAD, gap closing, mesh repair, simplification

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Bibtex

@INCOLLECTION{borodin-2002-progressive,
        author = {Borodin, Pavel and Novotni, Marcin and Klein, Reinhard},
        editor = {Vince, J. and Earnshaw, R.},
         pages = {201--213},
         title = {Progressive Gap Closing for Mesh Repairing},
     booktitle = {Advances in Modelling, Animation and Rendering},
          year = {2002},
         month = jul,
     publisher = {Springer Verlag},
   institution = {Universit{\"a}t Bonn},
  organization = {Computer Graphics Society (CGS)},
      keywords = {CAD, gap closing, mesh repair, simplification},
      abstract = {Modern 3D acquisition and modeling tools generate high-quality, detailed geometric models. However,
                  in order to cope with the associated complexity, several mesh decimation methods have been developed
                  in the recent years. On the other hand, a common problem of geometric modeling tools is the
                  generation of consistent three-dimensional meshes. Most of these programs output meshes containing
                  degenerate faces, T-vertices, narrow gaps and cracks. Applying well-established decimation methods
                  to such meshes results in severe artifacts due to lack of consistent connectivity information. The
                  industrial relevance of this problem is emphasized by the fact that as an output of most of the
                  commercial CAD/CAM and other modeling tools, the user usually gets consistent meshes only for
                  separate polygonal patches as opposed to the whole mesh.
                  
                  In this paper we propose a solution, which interprets the above issue as a mesh boundary decimation
                  task. As suggested by Garland and Heckbert and Popovic and Hoppe, adding a vertex pair contraction
                  operation enables to join unconnected regions of the mesh. In addition to this and the usual
                  edge-collapse operation, we introduce a new vertex-edge collapse operation. This provides extra
                  support for closing gaps and stitching together the boundaries of triangle patches lying in near
                  proximity to each other. In our method, the decimation process is error controlled and conducted in
                  a progressive manner in terms of the error. Therefore, the user is enabled to visually inspect and
                  interactively influence the procedure.},
          isbn = {1-85233-654-4},
    conference = {Computer Graphics International (CGI2002)}
}