Mesh Forging: Editing of 3D-Meshes Using Implicitly Defined Occluders

In proceedings of Symposium on Geometry Processing 2003, June 2003
Presented at Symposium on Geometry Processing 2003
 

Abstract

In recent years the ease of use and the flexibility in the editing process shifted into focus in modelling and animation applications. In this spirit we present a 3D mesh editing method that is similar to the simple constrained deformation (SCODEF) method[1]. We extend this method to the so-called Mesh Forging paradigm by adding an occluder to the editing environment. Our method resembles and was in fact motivated by the forging process where an anvil is used to give the manipulated object the desired shape. While users perform the editing operation by directly manipulating the 3D-mesh, the occluder is defined implicitly. To enable fine detail edits even in sparsely triangulated areas, we propose an adaptive refinement method that also allows the creation of sharp features where desired. This is combined with a method to adaptively refine the underlying mesh in occluder contact regions. The functionality and ease of use of our editing approach is shown by several examples.

[1] Paul Borrel and Ari Rappoport: Simple constrained deformations for geometric modeling and interactive design, ACM Transactions on Graphics,13(2):137-155, 1994

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Bibtex

@INPROCEEDINGS{bendels-2003-mesh,
      author = {Bendels, Gerhard H. and Klein, Reinhard},
       title = {Mesh Forging: Editing of 3D-Meshes Using Implicitly Defined Occluders},
   booktitle = {Symposium on Geometry Processing 2003},
        year = {2003},
       month = jun,
    abstract = {In recent years the ease of use and the flexibility in the
                editing process shifted into focus in modelling and animation
                applications. In this spirit we present a 3D mesh editing method that is
                similar to the simple constrained deformation (SCODEF) method[1]. We
                extend this method to the so-called Mesh Forging paradigm by adding an
                occluder to the editing environment. Our method resembles and was in fact
                motivated by the forging process where an anvil is used to give the
                manipulated object the desired shape. While users perform the editing
                operation by directly manipulating the 3D-mesh, the occluder is defined
                implicitly. To enable fine detail edits even in sparsely triangulated
                areas, we propose an adaptive refinement method that also allows the
                creation of sharp features where desired. This is combined with a method
                to adaptively refine the underlying mesh in occluder contact regions. The
                functionality and ease of use of our editing approach is shown by several
                examples.
                
                [1] Paul Borrel and Ari Rappoport:  Simple constrained deformations for geometric modeling and
                interactive design,  ACM Transactions on Graphics,13(2):137-155, 1994},
  conference = {Symposium on Geometry Processing 2003}
}