Appearance Bending: A Perceptual Editing Paradigm for Data-Driven Material Models

In proceedings of Vision, Modeling & Visualization, The Eurographics Association, 2017
 

Abstract

Data-driven representations of material appearance play an important role in a wide range of applications. Unlike with analytical models, however, the intuitive and efficient editing of tabulated reflectance data is still an open problem. In this work, we introduce appearance bending, a set of image-based manipulation operators, such as thicken, inflate, and roughen, that implement recent insights from perceptual studies. In particular, we exploit a link between certain perceived visual properties of a material, and specific bands in its spectrum of spatial frequencies or octaves of a wavelet decomposition. The result is an editing interface that produces plausible results at interactive rates, even for drastic manipulations. We present the effectiveness of our method on a database of bidirectional texture functions (BTFs) for a variety of material samples.

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Bibtex

@INPROCEEDINGS{2017_mylo_appearancebending,
     author = {Mylo, Marlon and Giesel, Martin and Zaidi, Qasim and Hullin, Matthias B. and Klein, Reinhard},
      title = {Appearance Bending: A Perceptual Editing Paradigm for Data-Driven Material Models},
  booktitle = {Vision, Modeling {\&} Visualization},
       year = {2017},
  publisher = {The Eurographics Association},
   abstract = {Data-driven representations of material appearance play an important role in a wide range of
               applications. Unlike with analytical models, however, the intuitive and efficient editing of
               tabulated reflectance data is still an open problem. In this work, we introduce appearance bending,
               a set of image-based manipulation operators, such as thicken, inflate, and roughen, that implement
               recent insights from perceptual studies. In particular, we exploit a link between certain perceived
               visual properties of a material, and specific bands in its spectrum of spatial frequencies or
               octaves of a wavelet decomposition. The result is an editing interface that produces plausible
               results at interactive rates, even for drastic manipulations. We present the effectiveness of our
               method on a database of bidirectional texture functions (BTFs) for a variety of material samples.}
}