Design and Implementation of Practical Bidirectional Texture Function Measurement Devices focusing on the Developments at the University of Bonn

In: Sensors (Apr. 2014), 14:5
 

Abstract

Understanding as well as realistic reproduction of the appearance of materials play an important role in computer graphics, computer vision and industry. They enable applications such as digital material design, virtual prototyping and faithful virtual surrogates for entertainment, marketing, education or cultural heritage documentation. A particularly fruitful way to obtain the digital appearance is the acquisition of reflectance from real-world material samples. Therefore, a great variety of devices to perform this task has been proposed. In this work, we investigate their practical usefulness. We first identify a set of necessary attributes and establish a general categorization of different designs that have been realized. Subsequently, we provide an in-depth discussion of three particular implementations by our work group, demonstrating advantages and disadvantages of different system designs with respect to the previously established attributes. Finally, we survey the existing literature to compare our implementation with related approaches.

Stichwörter: acquisition device, BRDF, BTF, camera calibration, gonioreflectometer, HDR, light field, reflectance

The full-text of the publication is available at http://www.mdpi.com/1424-8220/14/5/7753.

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Bibtex

@ARTICLE{schwartz-2014-setups,
    author = {Schwartz, Christopher and Sarlette, Ralf and Weinmann, Michael and Rump, Martin and Klein, Reinhard},
     title = {Design and Implementation of Practical Bidirectional Texture Function Measurement Devices focusing
              on the Developments at the University of Bonn},
   journal = {Sensors},
    volume = {14},
    number = {5},
      year = {2014},
     month = apr,
  keywords = {acquisition device, BRDF, BTF, camera calibration, gonioreflectometer, HDR, light field, reflectance},
  abstract = {Understanding as well as realistic reproduction of the appearance of materials play an important
              role in computer graphics, computer vision and industry. They enable applications such as digital
              material design, virtual prototyping and faithful virtual surrogates for entertainment, marketing,
              education or cultural heritage documentation. A particularly fruitful way to obtain the digital
              appearance is the acquisition of reflectance from real-world material samples. Therefore, a great
              variety of devices to perform this task has been proposed. In this work, we investigate their
              practical usefulness. We first identify a set of necessary attributes and establish a general
              categorization of different designs that have been realized. Subsequently, we provide an in-depth
              discussion of three particular implementations by our work group, demonstrating advantages and
              disadvantages of different system designs with respect to the previously established attributes.
              Finally, we survey the existing literature to compare our implementation with related approaches.},
      issn = {1424-8220},
       url = {http://www.mdpi.com/1424-8220/14/5/7753},
       doi = {10.3390/s140507753}
}