Adaptation, fitness landscape learning and fast evolution

John Reinitz, Sergey Vakulenko, Dima Grigoriev und Andreas Weber
In: F1000Research (2019)
 

Abstract

We consider evolution of a large population, where fitness of each organism is defined by many phenotypical traits. These traits result from expression of many genes. Under some assumptions on fitness we prove that such model organisms are capable, to some extent, to recognize the fitness landscape. That fitness landscape learning sharply reduces the number of mutations needed for adaptation. Moreover, this learning increases phenotype robustness with respect to mutations, i.e., canalizes the phenotype. We show that learning and canalization work only when evolution is gradual. Organisms can be adapted to many constraints associated with a hard environment, if that environment becomes harder step by step. Our results explain why evolution can involve genetic changes of a relatively large effect and why the total number of changes are surprisingly small.

Bilder

Bibtex

@ARTICLE{ReinitzVakulenkoGrigorievWeber2019a,
    author = {Reinitz, John and Vakulenko, Sergey and Grigoriev, Dima and Weber, Andreas},
     title = {Adaptation, fitness landscape learning and fast evolution},
   journal = {F1000Research},
      year = {2019},
  abstract = {We consider evolution of a large population, where fitness of each organism is defined by many
              phenotypical traits. These traits result from expression of many genes. Under some assumptions on
              fitness we prove that such model organisms are capable, to some extent, to recognize the fitness
              landscape. That fitness landscape learning sharply reduces the number of mutations needed for
              adaptation. Moreover, this learning increases phenotype robustness with respect to mutations, i.e.,
              canalizes the phenotype. We show that learning and canalization work only when evolution is gradual.
              Organisms can be adapted to many constraints associated with a hard environment, if that environment
              becomes harder step by step. Our results explain why evolution can involve genetic changes of a
              relatively large effect and why the total number of changes are surprisingly small.},
       url = {https://doi.org/10.12688/f1000research.18575.1},
       doi = {10.12688/f1000research.18575.1}
}